Joint group for priests’ access to scenes of traumatic violence


Cardinal Vincent Nichols and Metropolitan Police Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick have agreed to work together to establish a joint group to study “the access given, or refused, to Catholic priests to scenes of traumatic violence”.


In particular, the group will consider “whether any changes are required to the guidance issued to officers faced with such situations”.


The move comes after the killing of Sir David Amess MP at a constituency surgery at Belfairs Methodist Church in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, on Friday, 15 October 2021.


Cardinal Vincent made the announcement in a short statement, greeting Commissioner Cressida Dick ahead of the annual Catholic Police Guild (CPG) Requiem Mass at Westminster Cathedral.


In his statement, the Cardinal also welcomed police officers from around the country: “I wish to thank all of you for the service you give to the people of this country, often in the most difficult of circumstances and with the many challenges facing you.


“In recent days questions have arisen concerning the access given, or refused, to Catholic priests to scenes of traumatic violence, such as the violent death of Sir David Amess.


“The Metropolitan Police Commissioner and I have agreed to establish a joint group to study this issue and whether any changes are required to the guidance issued to officers faced with such a situation”


The Mass was celebrated by Bishop Alan Williams SM, the CPG's newly-appointed liaison to the Bishops' Conference.


The Requiem Mass takes place each year in November, the month of the Holy Souls, to pray for deceased members of the CPG. It is attended by serving and retired representatives from police forces around the country, as well as several CPG chaplains.

6 views0 comments